During World War II, natives on Pacific islands saw something most unusual. Strange men appeared, cleared long strips of land and built structures decorated with flags. Some of these men wore large cups over their ears, while others waved sticks and, almost magically, machines appeared from the sky carrying valuable cargo.

After the war ended, the men left and the supplies stopped coming. Some of the natives formed cargo cults which copied many of the the rituals the soldiers performed. They marched in formation, wore cups over their ears and waved sticks around. Alas, no airplanes ever came.

Clearly, the idea was patently absurd. Anybody who thinks that waving sticks will cause airplanes to appear is missing some basic principles about how air travel works. Yet many modern executives also believe by mimicking the tactics of others they will somehow achieve the same results. These “cargo cult strategists” don’t do much better than the islanders.

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https://washingtonspectator.org/democracy-trump-nixon-perlstein/

http://www.unesco.org/culture/ich/en/what-is-intangible-heritage-00003

http://www.unesco.org/culture/ich/en/what-is-intangible-heritage-00003

“The term ‘cultural heritage’ has changed content considerably in recent decades, partially owing to the instruments developed by UNESCO. Cultural heritage does not end at monuments and collections of objects. It also includes traditions or living expressions inherited from our ancestors and passed on to our descendants, such as oral traditions, performing arts, social practices, rituals, festive events, knowledge and practices concerning nature and the universe or the knowledge and skills to produce traditional crafts.” (Excerpt)

http://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/gobekli-tepe-the-worlds-first-temple-83613665/?all

http://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/why-was-benjamin-franklins-basement-filled-with-skeletons-524521/?utm_source=facebook.com&utm_medium=socialmedia

https://library.educause.edu/resources/2016/9/7-things-you-should-know-about-blockchain

http://news.harvard.edu/gazette/story/2016/10/laugh-your-way-to-success/

http://news.harvard.edu/gazette/story/2016/10/laugh-your-way-to-success/

This historical analysis uses internal sugar industry documents to describe how the industry sought to influence the scientific debate over the dietary causes of coronary heart disease in the 1950s and 1960s.

NYT reports: “The sugar industry paid scientists in the 1960s to play down the link between sugar and heart disease and promote saturated fat as the culprit instead, newly released historical documents show.”

Source: Sugar Industry and Coronary Heart Disease Research:  A Historical Analysis of Internal Industry Documents | JAMA Internal Medicine | JAMA Network