Posts Tagged ‘business’

During World War II, natives on Pacific islands saw something most unusual. Strange men appeared, cleared long strips of land and built structures decorated with flags. Some of these men wore large cups over their ears, while others waved sticks and, almost magically, machines appeared from the sky carrying valuable cargo.

After the war ended, the men left and the supplies stopped coming. Some of the natives formed cargo cults which copied many of the the rituals the soldiers performed. They marched in formation, wore cups over their ears and waved sticks around. Alas, no airplanes ever came.

Clearly, the idea was patently absurd. Anybody who thinks that waving sticks will cause airplanes to appear is missing some basic principles about how air travel works. Yet many modern executives also believe by mimicking the tactics of others they will somehow achieve the same results. These “cargo cult strategists” don’t do much better than the islanders.

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Via Business Insider:

 

“As the war over income inequality wages on, super-rich Seattle entrepreneur Nick Hanauer has been raising the hackles of his fellow 1-percenters, espousing the contrarian argument that rich people don’t actually create jobs. The position is controversial — so much so that TED is refusing to post a talk that Hanauer gave on the subject. National Journal reports today that TED officials decided not to put Hanauer’s March 1 speech up online after deeming his remarks “too politically controversial” for the site…”.

Multicultural meetings can be tricky to lead. “People bring their cultural baggage with them wherever they go—and that includes the workplace,” says Jeanne M. Brett, professor of dispute resolution and negotiations at Kellogg School of Management. Communication styles vary from culture to culture as do notions of authority and hierarchy, which only heightens the potential for misunderstanding and hard feelings. “If you don’t prepare for cultural differences and anticipate them at the front end, they’re a lot harder to deal with after the fact,” she says. It’s daunting but you needn’t feel overwhelmed, says Erin Meyer, a professor at INSEAD and the author of The Culture Maps. Approach your cross-cultural meeting with an open mind. And, have faith in your abilities because “you likely have more experience than you know,” adds Andy Molinsky, professor of organizational behavior at Brandeis University International Business School and the author of the book Global Dexterity. “You’ve probably run meetings where there was quite a lot of diversity, be it gender diversity, functional diversity, seniority diversity, or just different personalities—culture is one more element,” he says. Here are some ideas to help ensure that your multicultural meetings go smoothly.

Source: How to Run a Meeting of People from Different Cultures