Posts Tagged ‘diversity’

US History teachers at the secondary school level, as well as Global Studies and Participation in Government teachers, should explore this site and try to answer the big questions posed in this site.

Although this site focuses on religious diversity in the United States, it is also about answering the bigger questions about citizenship. It asks who Americans are when they say, “One nation under God”? So often, people make comments in social networks and in face to face conversations about the endangering of Christian beliefs and make claims that the USA is a Christian nation. They dismiss or forget the USA’s exceptionalism is linked to its pluralism. For the country to be “great”,  it must uphold and appreciate this history of inclusion, but must also include the ability to dialogue–not just talk for or talk at others–but to actually dialogue. Diana Eck explains: “Dialogue means both speaking and listening, and that process reveals both common understandings and real differences. Dialogue does not mean everyone at the “table” will agree with one another. Pluralism involves the commitment to being at the table — with one’s commitments.”

I have learned about this site from a Great Courses audiobook by Prof. Charles Kimballhttp://www.thegreatcourses.com/courses/comparative-religion.html. As I listen to the first few discs, it occurs to me that Marshall McLuhan’s descriptions of violence and tribalism are manifesting. We have to educate more people with messages from the Pluralism Project to drive back the tide of fear and intolerance.

Source: History of the Pluralism Project | The Pluralism Project

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Jerry Seinfeld once focused an episode of his sitcom on the concept of personal space, giving us a new term: the “close talker.”

via How Different Cultures Handle Personal Space : Code Switch : NPR.

The American family looks different than it did 50, or even 10, years ago.

The number of children living with two married parents has steadily decreased since the ’80s. A 2012 Pew study found that 2 million dads stay at home with their kids — a …

Source: www.huffingtonpost.com

Before an educator speaks about "the average family" or some other fiction, take a look through these pictures. maybe, these pics should be looked at each day before heading to work in the morning. Sometimes, we come from homogeneous neighborhoods of one kind or another and forget the world is different outside of these neighborhoods.  

The American family looks different than it did 50, or even 10, years ago.

The number of children living with two married parents has steadily decreased since the ’80s. A 2012 Pew study found that 2 million dads stay at home with their kids — a …

Source: www.huffingtonpost.com

Before a teacher speaks about "the average family" or some other fiction, take a look through these pictures. maybe, these pics should be looked at each day before heading to work in the morning. Sometimes, we come from homogeneous neighborhoods of one kind or another and forget the world is different outside of these neighborhoods.  

Neurons — the nerve cells that make up the brain and nervous system — look different from all other cells in the body. And from one another.

Source: www.brainfacts.org

Every neuron is different: "That diversity is extraordinary. Scientists have identified hundreds of types and subtypes of neurons using advanced cellular imaging techniques, and more are discovered each year."

RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — When Brazilians were given a chance to describe their skin color, they came up with 136 shades and variations. The survey was done in 1976 by the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics, and was published again in a 2011 Congressional document titled: The Constitutional Commission on Justice and Citizenship.

Source: www.idahostatejournal.com

“Basically, if you’re going to grant exemptions, then you should grant them both to religious believers and nonbelievers who have comparable ethical or philosophical views,” Schwartzman says in an interview. “It’s not to say that you should grant them in any particular case—it’s that you should grant them equally.”

via The Limits of Religious Tolerance – The Chronicle Review – The Chronicle of Higher Education.