Posts Tagged ‘United States’

Having launched and led the battle against offshore tax evasion, America is now part of the problem

Partly because of state rights, the US can appear to have multiple personalities:

“Business lobbyists and states with lots of registered firms, led by Delaware, have long stymied proposed federal legislation that would require more openness in corporate ownership. (Incorporation is a state matter, not a federal one.) America will often investigate a shell company if asked to by a foreign government that suspects wrongdoing. But incorporation agents do not have to collect ownership information. This is in contrast to Britain, which will soon have a public register of companies’ beneficial owners.”

Source: The biggest loophole of all | The Economist

Advertisements

” it is absurd to boil our national well being down to a single metric, especially one conceived of in the 1930’s for a much different economy.  As I’ve pointed out before, numbers can lie.  While there is support building for alternatives to GDP, such as happiness indices, we are still largely confusing metrics for meaning.  We can do better.

 

“And in the past, we have.  Eisenhower’s vision created the Interstate Highway System, Kennedy inspired us to go to the moon, Johnson’s Great Society programs pulled millions out of desperate poverty.  More recently, we decoded the human genome and are now embarked on a similar quest to replicate the human brain, but nothing on a truly national scale.” (excerpt)

via The Clothesline Paradox | Digital Tonto.

Charts showing how Americans have moved between states for 112 years.

Source: www.nytimes.com

See on Scoop.itTeacher Tools and Tips

See on Scoop.itResearch, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions

It has been argued that the overall past success of the U.S. economy suggests that high-school math performance is not that critical for sustained growth in economic productivity. After all, U.S. students trailed their peers in the very first international survey undertaken nearly 50 years ago. That is the wrong message to take away however. Other factors contributed to the relatively high rate of growth in economic productivity during the last half of the 20th century, including the openness of the country’s markets, respect for property rights, low levels of political corruption, and limited intrusion of government into the operations of the marketplace. The United States, moreover, has always benefited from the in-migration of talent from abroad.

Sharrock‘s insight:

For a few days now, I’ve been wondering about the relationship of a nation’s Nobel Prize winners to PISA scores. I finally decided to ask the question in Google. Here’s one hit: “Clearly the countries with the worst PISA scores are those with the most impressive Nobel record. Equally significant, the correlation between PISA performance and GDP per capita is, as both Baker and Chang suggest, rather weak (less than 0.5).” http://www.opendemocracy.net/ourkingdom/jeremy-fox/are-pisa-scores-really-that-important.

 

But this article also presents an interesting exploration.

See on educationnext.org

See on Scoop.itResearch, Applied Thinking and Applied Theory: Solutions with Interesting Implications, Problem Solving, Teaching and Research driven solutions

Finding PISA sceptics proved easier than I expected.  A Huffington Post articleby Diane Ravitch, professor of education at New York University dismisses international test scores as worthless. While the US has never been first in the world, nor even near the top, on international tests, Ravitch claims it has done pretty well economically and in terms of scientific invention and business creativity – in fact better on many measures than any other nation. She bases these assertions partly on her own observations but more on a paper by Keith Baker, a retired researcher at the US Department of Education, entitled Are International Tests Worth Anything?

 

Sharrock‘s insight:

For a few days now, I’ve been wondering about the relationship of a nation’s Nobel Prize winners to PISA scores. I finally decided to ask the question in Google. Here’s one hit: “Clearly the countries with the worst PISA scores are those with the most impressive Nobel record. Equally significant, the correlation between PISA performance and GDP per capita is, as both Baker and Chang suggest, rather weak (less than 0.5).”

See on www.opendemocracy.net

See on Scoop.iteducational implications

News, Articles and Community for district-level decision makers in K-12 education. Magazine published monthly, with daily news and blogs and online content. Archives available.
See on www.districtadministration.com